Tag Archives: remembering

Visit

I’m not big on anniversaries (also
cause I’m no good at
remembering dates, especially the bad ones), I just like
to keep you close, remember you on a
regular basis. You’re just dropping in,
coming to see how I’m doing. — Doing fine
now, dad. Thanks for checking.
See you soon

Clay

When my grandmother would see the
Moles that had escaped the broken bottles
Shoved in the thick, dark clay, while
They were furrily squirreling along
The edges of the lawn, she would run
As fast as her short, swollen legs could
Carry her, to find a big shovel
And bash their heads in

I still remember her cackling, her
Rosy cheeks, the big parties at my
Grandparents’ grange, where all the
Family gathered and that time I sneaked
Out at night, slipped into the backseat
Of our car and fell asleep, until everybody
Came looking for me, worried sick
About where I would be

She is long dead now

Bad faith

We are our choices.

― Jean-Paul Sartre

I did not know, but apparently it is World Book Day and Anindita Ganguly asked: “What are the books that you keep reading often? Do you have any favourite book/ books?”

To answer that question: I do have some favorite books, but I don’t actually reread. There are too many books I still want to read, before I again start looking up books I already have read.

Favorite books though… Well, off the top of my head these come to mind:

About Haruki Murakami… ‘Kafka on the shore’ was the first one I read of him and it is pretty special to me. I was really into the atmosphere that Murakami manages to put into his storytelling. Murakami’s ‘Men without women’ I read on the plane, when we were flying back from Indonesia in 2019. I bought it at the airport in Jakarta and I just blazed through it. When we touched ground again in Amsterdam, about 14 hours after takeoff, I was almost done with it.

And while I was watching the Yann Martel interview about ‘Life of Pi’ I link to in the list above, I was thinking… this could actually be a book that I could read again. – Immediately followed by: hold on, I also still have to read his ‘Beatrice and Virgil‘, that is lying around here somewhere.

When I started thinking about other books that I could add to my list, in my mind I went back to books that I read in my… erm… youth, and that I know I really liked:

Truman Capote’s ‘In cold blood‘, ‘De kellner en de levenden’ (in English: ‘The waiter and the living‘) by Simon Vestdijk, Salman Rushdie’s ‘The Satanic Verses‘, Umberto Eco‘s ‘The Name of the Rose’ and his ‘Foucault’s Pendulum’.

I know I loved those books, but when I try to remember what they were about, I just have vague recollections, not an outlined idea of what their stories were really about. So, perhaps I should start rereading some of them. Why read something, love it, and then lose the plot right after? (Erm… Yes.)

A question then came up. Why did those stories not stick with me?

I think it had to do with my age and with the way I gave attention back then. I have always tried to get my hands and eyes on as much information and influences as I can. And I still do. The internet is great for that and I have a hunger for it. I don’t consider it a bad thing. But sometimes it has to be focused, reigned in again, you know? Shout “Whoa boy, calm down!” and meanwhile pull down hard, something like that.

The slower I go (read: the older I get) and the more I become conscious of my surroundings, the more I can appreciate the value of certain things that, when I was young, I would have passed without noticing. I’m also pretty sure that I miss a lot of things that my younger self would have noticed without noticing it. 

It is what it is.

Hey! It’s Friday again! Who’d have thought? (God, I can ramble sometimes.) My son has just made us some nice coffee and brought me a big mug of it, and my wife just called to tell me she can probably finish work early today. Yesss…